Bacon-Wrapped Scallops

IMG_5901This is such an old recipe, and I’ve seen many versions of it. It’s quick and simple, and can be part of a nutrient-dense meal, or served as appetizers. Make sure you get good organic pastured bacon if you can (local farms, farmers’ markets, good butchers, etc).

Ingredients:

6 slices of bacon, cut in half
12 medium-sized scallops (or 6 large, cut in half)
approx. 5 T butter, melted
as much garlic as you want (a few cloves), minced or pressed
salt and pepper
12 toothpicks

Preheat oven to 350 F. Lay the bacon out on a flat baking pan and bake it for about 10 minutes each side. You want it to really start cooking, but still be pliable. Remove from oven and lay on a plate to cool to the point that you can touch it without burning your fingers.
Pour most of the leftover bacon fat out of the baking pan (strain and save it–it’s great for cooking everything, or making mayo out of (recipe soon).
Add the garlic, salt and pepper to your melted butter. (You can keep some of this aside to pour over at the end.)
Dip each scallop piece into the garlic butter. Thoroughly coat each one.
Then wrap each scallop with a piece of the bacon and secure it with a toothpick (make sure toothpick goes all the way through the whole scallop and bacon on each side, so it doesn’t fall apart in the baking).
Place each scallop onto the greased baking pan.
Bake until scallops are done and bacon is starting to crisp a little (approximately 20 minutes).
Remove from oven, arrange on plates and pour remaining garlic butter over all.
These are also delicious with a chipotle mayo, for which I will try to get a recipe up soon.

 

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Sesame-Garlic Kale-Sweet Potato Salad

IMG_5691The key to the delicious taste of this one is the dressing, which is actually very simple, and we use it on lots of other veggies (sauteed broccoli is a favorite). It’s a great way to get kids to eat lots of garlic and ginger when they’re sick, too.
You can also have the dressing with just kale, to keep it really low carb. For the most part, we avoid sweet potatoes, but I’ve found that the small amount of sweet potato per serving in this doesn’t spike my daughter’s sugar.

Dressing ingredients:

1 cup toasted sesame oil
1/4–1/3  cup olive oil (make sure it’s extra virgin, organic)
tons of garlic, minced
approximately a 2″ X 2″ piece of fresh ginger (or more to taste), grated
1/8 cup rice vinegar
2 or 3 T tamari (make sure it’s organic–you don’t want to get any GMO soy)
1 scoop KAL organic stevia (or 1 tsp raw honey if you’re not doing really low sugar/carb)

Shake all ingredients together well in a jar. This makes quite a bit of dressing, not just enough for this salad. It’s always good to have around, and keeps really well for a long time in the fridge (though ours usually gets used up within a few days).

Other ingredients:

1 medium-sized bunch of kale, chopped into bite-sized pieces
1 medium to large sweet potato, also chopped into small bite-sized pieces
Coconut oil or Olive oil

Preheat oven to just below 325 F if using olive oil;just below 350 F if using coconut oil.

Toss the sweet potato with olive oil, then roast in oven until pieces just start to brown. Remove pieces onto a plate and let cool. They will become a little chewy. Once cool, combine sweet potatoes and kale together in a large bowl. Add as much of the dressing as you want and toss until veggies are all coated. Julienned red bell peppers are also good in this salad, and add some great color.

 

A couple of breakfast recipes

Recipes Included on this page:
1. Hot Nutty Cereal
2. End-of-summer Veggie Scrambled Eggs

Some moms of diabetic kids have been asking me to get more breakfast ideas up on here, as breakfast really is the most difficult meal for people who are used to a standard american diet (aka SAD) to figure out recipes for. The one piece of advice I keep giving is:think outside the box. Americans are so used to eating these ridiculously high-carb/sugar breakfasts that have everyone, diabetic or not, falling asleep (after bouncing off the walls, in the case of some sugar-laden kids!) by mid-morning, as they have a sugar-spike and then crash. So many of these breakfast “foods” people are used to are highly processed stuff that comes in a box. Think cereals, muffins, toast, pop-tarts. Grains, grains, grains. I don’t care if they are organic, whole-grain, even sprouted grain, whatever:it’s ALL SUGAR when it hits your blood;all has the same effect. If you want your kids (or yourself, for that matter) to sustain level blood sugar, especially after breakfast, you want to feed them good fats and proteins. Fat is slow-burning energy that sustains, unlike carbohydrates that is fast-burning energy that spikes sugar (and insulin). Combining some good carbs (such as veggies and/or low-glycemic fruits) with good fats and protein will sustain energy for long periods. If a kid eats a good healthy breakfast, he or she should not need a snack until lunch (I notice it’s become standard practice for schools to give kids a snack around 9 or 10 in the morning, 2 or 3 hours after breakfast. These kids are eating sugary, high-carb breakfasts, then “starving” and eating more sugary high-carb snacks mid-morning. It’s crazy, but has become common practice in this country, unlike in many other places.

Anyway, here are a couple more breakfast ideas that have been big hits in our house:

I’ve seen many versions of this oatmeal (or cream-of-wheat) substitute. This is one I’ve put together after trial-and-error with many of them:

Hot Nutty Cereal

2 cups raw walnuts (soaked and dehydrated) (you could also use 1 cup almonds/1 cup walnuts)
1 small to medium apple, diced
2 T ghee and/or coconut oil
1 T cinnamon
1 to 2 tsp cardamom (optional)
3 cups home-made almond milk and/or whole-fat coconut milk (we use Thai brand organic, which you can now find in most supermarkets, definitely in co-ops)
1 T vanilla extract
stevia to taste

Process nuts in a food processor until pretty finely ground. Stir in the cinnamon, cardamom and stevia.
Meanwhile, saute the apple in the coconut butter/ghee, until soft.
Add the nut/spice/stevia mixture into the apples in the pan, and stir for a minute or so until coated with the  oil.
Reduce the heat and add almond/coconut milk and vanilla extract. Stir well, then reduce heat even more, to low.
Cook, uncovered, stirring as needed, until mixture thickens to your liking (usually about 15 minutes).
Serve warm. Sometimes we pour raw cream over it, just like we used to with oatmeal. Or add berries. It’s a very filling breakfast, with all the good nut fats and proteins. It’s good cold later, too (this recipe will serve 2, but you may have some leftover).
Keeps in the fridge for about 5 or 6 days.

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My daughter is not crazy about plain old scrambled eggs, but when we add things in, she loves them. This is just one of many ways we prepare them that makes her gobble them up, no problem:

End-of-summer Veggie Scrambled Eggs

For one serving:

2 eggs, beaten well
2 to 4 T of full-fat cream cheese (raw, cultured, if you can find it locally)
2 T red onion, diced
2 T fresh basil, minced
1 T fresh parsley, minced
2 T fresh kale or other garden greens), diced
5 or 6 ripe sungold tomatoes (or other cherry tomato), halved
ghee for sauteeing/frying
Half an avocado for “garnish”

Add cream cheese by the tsp to beaten eggs (so you have 6 or 7 dollops of the cheese in the eggs). Saute onions in the ghee, over medium-low heat, until softened, then add other veggies and herbs. Cook for another 5 minutes or so, stirring frequently, then pour in egg/cheese mixture. Make sure to stir constantly so they don’t burn or stick (we have a great black-steel pan that is dedicated to cooking eggs, nothing else, and we keep it well-seasoned so we don’t get sticking problems. I do NOT recommend using any of those awful “non-stick” pans that seem to still be on the market). Cook to your liking.
Serve warm with avocado slices on the side (and a dollop of cultured sour cream on top if you like).